Other Media

Glaser, M., 2002. The Road to Hell. Metropolis, [online] Available at: http://www.metropolismag.com/html/content_0802/gla/ [Accessed 4th December 2012].

In regard to professional ethics, acknowledging what it is we do is a beginning. It is clear that in the profession of graphic design the question of misrepresenting the truth arises almost immediately. So much of what we do can be seen as a distortion of the truth. Put another way, “He who enters the bath sweats.”

A signatory on the First Things First 2000 Manifesto (Lasn et al., 1999) Glaser is a supporter of ethical and responsible Graphic Design. To alert designers to the ethical pitfalls of commercial practice, Glaser printed 12 Steps, allowing designers to establish their “own level of discomfort”. By admitting to committing several of the ‘sins’ (Kane, 2011, Millman, 2010), Glaser provides empathy for the reader. Discussing ‘The Road to Hell’ with Debbie Millman (2010), Glaser raises the personal consideration, “Where will I stop?”. Millman and Glaser discuss at length the importance of a personal ethical standpoint and preventing the assumption that the profession of Graphic Design will provide protection from unethical practice.

‘The Road to Hell’ is useful for designers, allowing them to quantify their own ethics and compare it to fellow professionals. Furthermore it supports and enhances Glaser’s educational work regarding ethics in Graphic Design. From the above extract and supporting article, Glaser identifies the importance of awareness in practice especially regarding truth distortion. ‘The Road to Hell’ demonstrates the role of personal consideration in Graphic Design employment.

Milton Glaser's Road to Hell

Milton Glaser’s Road to Hell

Millman, D., 2010. Milton Glaser Podcast Interview, Design Maters. [podcast] October 2010. Available at: htp://designobserver.com/media/audio/Milton_Glaser.mp3 [Accessed 20th December 2012].

Discussing ‘The Road to Hell’ with Debbie Millman (2010), Glaser raises the personal consideration;

Where will I stop?

Millman and Glaser discuss the importance of a personal ethical standpoint and preventing the assumption that the profession of graphic design provides protection from unethical practice.

Lasn, K. et al., 1999. First Things First Manifesto 2000. Eye Magazine, 33 (9), [online] Available at: http://www.eyemagazine.com/feature/article/first-things-first-manifesto-2000 [Accessed 5th December 2012].

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